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From the Pastor's Heart

August 2019

August 2019

I know I am dating myself, but with this recent heat wave, I suddenly found myself humming the tune to Nat King Cole’s 1963 hit, “Those Lazy-Hazy-Crazy Days of Summer.”

July 2019

July 2019

I was pleased to receive an invitation to attend the Quaker Valley Commencement. It was a very moving and memorable experience. The speeches offered by some of the graduating seniors were filled with heart, strength and emotion.

June 2019

June 2019

In the marriage ceremonies I conduct, I never ask, “Who gives this woman to be married to this man?” No one is property to be GIVEN to another. I always ask both sets of parents to give their blessing to the marriage of their children. Yet there is something endearing about being spoken for.

May 2019

May 2019

On Easter, I said one of the Easter challenges God puts before us is to see those around us… really see them. But often, we see only what we want to see. Sometimes, like Thomas insisting on seeing the wounds of Jesus, we insist on seeing the wounds of others before we believe that the people we serve are persons worthy and deserving of grace and kindness during their most vulnerable hour.

April 2019

April 2019

What I wish to convey to you in this pastor’s letter is the importance of allowing scars to define us; not our scars however, but the scars of Jesus. Jesus's scars have their own story to tell.

March 2019

March 2019

I don’t think it is a secret that if you looked up “party animal” in the dictionary, you will NOT find my name or picture there. However, this lackluster kind of guy has a very odd allure to the festival of Mardi Gras.

February 2019

February 2019

One of the joys of being a pastor is to hear your stories, stories like these—reports of epiphanies.

January 2019

January 2019

The name of this month has associations with the concepts of beginnings, doorways, openings, gateways and transitions. There’s little doubt that the name derives from the Roman god Janus, who is usually depicted as having two faces, one looking to the past and one to the future. This year, I can’t help but wonder what the United Methodist Church will look like after February.

December 2018

December 2018

“Do you know what that young man said? When he rang the doorbell, and I answered, he asked, ‘Is he home?’ I told him, ‘No.’ He replied, ‘Oh good, he makes me nervous!’”

“Say what? Now why in the world would I make him nervous?”

“Maybe it is because you used your PREACHER’S VOICE, and you intimidated him.”

November 2018

November 2018

I knew the day would eventually come. I tried my best to not dwell on it, as it was just too painful, too final. Thursday, October 11, that dreaded day came. There was no more denying it or refusing to think about it.

October 2018

October 2018

While sitting at my desk in the church office, I received a phonecall from Nancy. She asked, “Did you see Cindy’s post on Facebook?” (Cindy is Nancy’s best friend from high school.) I told her I had not and immediately went to Cindy’s page to find what Nancy found so interesting. Here is what Cindy posted…

September 2018

September 2018

Today one does not need a textbook to learn. You can simply go to your computer and find your way to YouTube, and there you will find how to do any number of things. Someone, somewhere has created a video to show you how to do what you’re about to attempt; whether it’s a repair for your home or your car, how to put on makeup, learning self-defense or making dinner. All you need to do is look it up on the world’s most popular video site, and soon you’ll be an expert yourself—even if it’s expertise on the best way to massage your pet opossum (because, apparently, opossums need massages!).

July 2018

July 2018

These past few weeks, I have not had a smile on my face or heart. In fact, my heart is broken over the desperate cries of precious little ones as they were ripped out of the arms of their migrant parents. The anguish and desperation in their voices has reduced me to tears. This IS NOT the American way, or at least I pray it IS NOT the American way.

June 2018

June 2018

Grief is perhaps the greatest teacher known to humankind. It comes at a very steep price. Grief teaches us perspective, patience, love like never before, kindness, tolerance, acceptance, appreciation for the present moment, and so much more. Grief never ends, but it changes. It’s a passage, not a place to stay. Grief is neither a sign of weakness nor a lack of faith. It is the price of love.

May 2018

May 2018

Do you have a nickname? When I was growing up, I had two nicknames. The first was Rara. I am not sure where it came from. Maybe my older brother couldn’t say Russel, and as he tried to pronounce my name, it came out “Rara.” I utilized that nickname with all the little children Nancy babysat over the years. Many of those children are now adults and still call me “Rara.”

April 2018

April 2018

The most beautiful sight to see is when the shepherd approaches his flock in the morning and calls out to them, “Sheep, sheep, sheep!” The first to run to him are the bummer lambs, because they know his voice. It’s not that they are more loved; it’s just that they believe it. I am so grateful that Christ calls Himself the Good Shepherd. I am a bummer lamb. Chances are you are too. 

March 2018

March 2018

As I sit here at my computer keyboard, it is the day before my 64th birthday. Wow! How is that even possible? Depending upon which shoes you are in, 64 is a youngster and for others, well, you are seen as “old as dirt.”

February 2018

February 2018

My running route has turned into somewhat of an obstacle course with discarded Christmas trees strewn on the sidewalks. As I was running, I thought, only a month ago, these trees held special meaning and had a prominent place in the warmth and love of homes. And only a few weeks later, they are thrown to the curbside. The once beautiful, green branches decorated with lights and ornaments are now a tarnished brown, waiting to be burned or shredded into mulch.

January 2018

January 2018

The end of one year and the beginning of another is usually a time to look back to what has been and to look forward to what can be. To look back includes both the positive, as well as the negative, things. To look forward to what can be or should be possible is also an important exercise. As we stand at the threshold of a brand new year, it might help us explore the answer to the above exercise by reexamining one of the classic Peanuts cartoon strips.

December 2017

December 2017

Brian Abel Ragan’s father told him the same story every year, growing up, about a little boy so poor he had nothing but one toy: a little beat-up plastic car with two wheels and a broken windshield.